Tomorrow’s fossil (Details)

 

Leaf imprint in cement path, Riverbank Park, Yass, NSW, Australia

Leaf a good impression!

 

In about 2000 CE a small town called Yass, in what was then inland Australia, constructed new civil works for connecting a minor waterway to the mercantile centre. At some time during the construction, leaves from nearby trees must have blown across the new pathway.  ♦

 


Weekly Photo Challenge – Details

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/details/

Photo taken with my old Canon Powershot A550.

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Sydney Harbour Bridge aka (affectionately) ‘The Giant Coat Hanger’

Australians like to poke fun at things*, especially themselves. So it’s with mostly pride and a fair bit of self-deprecation that we nicknamed our wonderfully unique Harbour Bridge in Sydney, ‘The Giant Coat Hanger’!

Sydney Harbour Bridge, Sydney, Australia

The Giant Coat Hanger

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I don’t know if kids still call it that? But my family did.

And although it was an absolute must for many school excursions and family holidays from ‘the Bush’, and everyone had the obligatory harbour shot with The Bridge front and centre, we still pulled it down a peg* and called it The Coat Hanger.

So I was amused at myself, a couple of weeks ago, when we were on a Sydney Harbour lunch cruise…

Apart from a couple of tables and us the boat was patronised by large groups of older tourists. Cameras on the swaying foredeck was the order of the day.

I resisted.

After all I’d seen The Harbour before, had even lived in Sydney where the harbour was my daily commute, and we had already done a hop-on hop-off harbour cruise a few years before where I wore out my shutter button. And, of course, there was lunch! Well, it wasn’t gourmet but that was part of what we’d come for.

So we were enjoying the harbour, the views and the beautiful day. We ate and drank and reminisced, watched the other boats, a ferry or two, and slipped in and around the coves and bays of blue water gawking at the amazing waterfront real estate.

But when it came to the final promenade up the main basin of Port Jackson, past ‘Pinchgut’ or Fort Denison, and approaching the Opera House and ‘The Giant Coat Hanger’ … I just couldn’t help myself!

Sydney Harbour by lunch cruise, Sydney, Australia

The grand icons of stunning Sydney Harbour

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The cruise would end at Darling Harbour so it meant we would go UNDER The Bridge! I’ve been on, over, around, and at the base of The Bridge for New Year’s Eve, but never UNDER it by water!!

So I scrambled last minute to the top deck, braced myself against the lurching railing, and waited for the money shot!

ZOOOMMMMPP! That was the sound of my camera closing back up again, due to empty batteries!!!

So I laughed at myself for succumbing to the innate tourist urge … and sat and enjoyed the rest of the view!  ♦

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But here are some of my past views of The Giant Coat Hanger.

I like to do things a little differently – being on ‘the road less travelled’ and all that – and as an Aussie I guess I don’t take The Bridge too seriously, so I usually look for oddball angles!

 


Aussie icons series

Photos taken with my old Canon Powershot A550, 2008-2014

* ‘to poke fun at’ – to make fun of in an affectionate, cheeky way.

We often do this with a serious looking face, then a delayed grin or a wink when the person takes you seriously. Some people, like my uncle, always teases with a straight face and I get caught thinking he’s serious just about every time! You think I’d have learnt by now!!

* ‘to pull something/someone down a peg’ – to treat something / someone with a dose of reality so they don’t become too full of vanity at their own greatness.

Shearers: Blue singlets and boots

'Westbourne', Berremangra Rd via Bookham, New South Wales, Australia

‘Westbourne’ shearers’ quarters

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On a back road from Yass to Harden (New South Wales, Australia), heading into a rolling green valley, we drove on tar covered with cow pats.

A rambling old homestead overlooks a dam, a Soldier Settlement property of many decades and many acres.

Down the road the shearers’ quarters waits silently in the sinking gold of the afternoon. Many doors lead to many rooms. Nearby a meat hanging room is empty and well-scrubbed.

The well-worn tar road binds these shearers’ quarters to their purpose, the wool shed.

I wonder how many boots have climbed the stoop, weary from a long hot day bent over wool? How many heads have rested on a ticking mattress, too weary to undress before sleep?

And how many bristled chins have then risen with first light to a plate of eggs and bread? To stride to ‘the boards’ for another day bent over the shears in a blue singlet?

The shearers’ rooms are quiet now – dust motes dancing in the light through the windows – waiting for the next season.  ♦

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Aussie icons, ‘One Shot Wonders’ series

– To mark Australia Day on January 26, my ‘One Shot Wonders’ this week will feature good old Aussie icons.

Photo taken 17 November 2013, with Canon PowerShot A550

‘Westbourne’ shearers’ quarters, Berremangra Rd, between Jugiong and Bookham, New South Wales, Australia

Notes:

Sheep are an important part of Australia’s history. They were brought to Australia with the First Fleet of convicts and soldiers on 26 January 1788.

Yass Valley and nearby Harden Shire of New South Wales are among the important sheep raising areas of Australia, for meat and fine wool production.

Moo mobile! (‘One Shot Wonders’)

A cow car by any other name.

How udder-ly amazing.

Moo Mobile, paddock on Marked Tree Road, near Gundaroo, New South Wales, Australia

Moo Mobile out to pasture, near Gundaroo village, NSW

Well, we were out for a Sunday drive back in May and there she was – The Moo Mobile – just out in the middle of a paddock! As you do!

Got no idea why. …Well, why not?

Has to be the quirkiest thing we’ve seen while driving around.

And now I have the words of the Woody Guthrie song going around in my head:

‘Take you riding in my [cow] car. Take you riding in my [cow] car…’

and with the second verse engine noises going ‘moo-moo’. Help!

*

For the wonderful, full experience you can enjoy the song on YouTube. Show your kids!

But be warned: it’ll get stuck in your head. My apologies in advance.

RIDING IN MY CAR by Woody Guthrie, illustrated by Scott Menchin

And feel free to add your own cow puns below. Here’s to a fun 2014!

CC  ♦

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‘One Shot Wonders’ series

How to find The Moo Mobile:

S35° 00.845′ E149° 17.779′

Near Gundaroo village, New South Wales, Australia – 273.3km SW from Sydney, 37.2km NNE from Canberra [Google Maps]

– From the main street of Gundaroo (Cork Street), turn right into Rosamel Street.

– Continue on to Marked Tree Road. The Moo Mobile is on the left, about 2km down the road.

All tar road to this point.

Gundaroo village, New South Wales, Australia

Gundaroo, ‘Visit Yass Valley’ (on-line), www.yassvalley.com.au

Welcome to Gundaroo“, webpage by Graeme Challinor

Christmas lights (Unplugged version)

Sunset on Christmas Eve 2013, Yass Valley, New South Wales, Australia

Christmas lights, the unplugged version

We wanted to keep it simple this year.

Hadn’t felt much like Christmas, until the last minute.

On Christmas Eve we decorated the little Christmas tree then sat down to a gourmet, cold spread.

Just the two of us,

before the Christmas Day travelling.

Salmon dip, Brie, turkey, mortadella, sun-dried tomato and feta salad, Greek salad, rocket leaves. Elderflower and lime cider.

Each mouthful an explosion.

*

Then a crimson light washed over the room, through the window,

and coloured our faces as on a hot day.

We rushed out mid-bite to watch the glorious sunset.

The sun melted behind the ‘veggie patch’,

a dormant garden ringed by pine trees.

Our own Christmas light show, the natural way!

Reminded me: the simple things in life are often the best.

Being in the moment (Creative challenge Day 5)

Benchseat up the back near the water tank facing the setting sun

‘What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.’

[Crowfoot, 1890]

Crowfoot (c. 1830 – 25 April 1890) or Isapo-Muxika was a chief of the Blackfoot First Nation in Canada.’ 

[http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Crowfoot]

Benchseat up the back near the water tank facing the setting sun

My favourite place to watch the sunset

For me, writing and taking photographs are how I just Be. No thoughts of the past, no worries for the future.

Just, in the moment.

Be.