Turret on turret (‘Iandra Castle’)

 

'Mt Oriel' homestead, known locally as Iandra Castle, via Greenthorpe, New South Wales, Australia

When one tower just isn’t enough.

As a youngun visiting my ‘grandparents’ I was fascinated by ‘Iandra Castle’. Iandra sort of backed onto the family sheep property between Young and Grenfell (central New South Wales) in a huge acres kind of way. I was always hoping for that country road detour to visit other rellies and a drive-by look at ‘the castle’.

A few years back we got to wander around inside ‘the castle’ on an open day! Sadly we weren’t allowed up in the turret. Can you imagine how impressive the view is from up there?  

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Weekly Photo Challenge, ‘Cherry On Top’

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/cherry-on-top/

Photo taken with my old Canon Powershot A550

‘Mount Oriel’, commonly known as ‘Iandra Castle’, is the elaborate homestead of the Iandra property near the village of Greenethorpe, New South Wales, Australia. The first home was established from 1880 and completed in 1911 in its current form by Mr George Henry Greene MLC, an Englishman by birth connected to aristocracy. Greene bought 32,000 acres of the poor wooded country, clearing it to grow corn and wheat. He built Iandra up into a very successful enterprise and pioneered share-farming practices. He also built the village of Greenethorpe nearby, for his workers.

‘Iandra Castle’ is located on Iandra Rd, 11 kms from Greenethorpe village, NSW, Australia at 34°04′51″S 148°21′51″E.

It has open days on some long weekends throughout the year. See their website for details.

http://iandracastle.com.au/

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‘Woo Back!’ World Record

WE DID IT AUSTRALIA!

Heavy horse ploughing for the World Record near Yass, New South Wales, Australia on 4 May 2014

On Sunday (4 May 2014) the World Record for Heavy Horses Ploughing was set at the “Woo Back!” Event on a property in Yass Valley, New South Wales, Australia.

Twenty-eight heavy horses, in pairs or singly, tilled the ground with antique ploughs. A crowd of over 5000 spectators braved the autumn chill to watch the record go down in history!

The feat has now been set in the Guinness Book of World Records for “The greatest number of horse drawn ploughmen/women to plough a paddock at the same time.”

A two year old heavy horse in training with a young handler.

They came from near and far across the country – from the city and the town, across the ranges and the paddocks – and that was just our family!

The giant horses lined up before the crest of the turned paddock, facing into the chill wind. Leather collars and harnesses with brasses and silver shone under heavy skies.

 

The crowd huddled by the marshal’s stand and stretched down the paddock, lining the fences.

Bagpipes echoed across the green hills. Then a young voice’s sweet tones called a hush over the crowd singing “Amazing Grace” and the Australian national anthem, “Advance Australia Fair”.

A school bell rang out to mark the start.

 

Heavy horses ploughing for the World Record set at Yass, NSW, Australia on 4 May 2014

Twenty-eight Clydesdales, Shires, Draught Horses, Cobs and other heavy breeds pulled at their horse collars and plodded over the rise to the edge of the paddock and then turned back on their own furrows.

 

Heavy horses ploughing for the World Record at Yass NSW Australia, on 4 May 2014

All manner of reconditioned ploughs, harrows, and scarifiers tasted the dirt again, some after lying idle for a generation. Some of the ploughs had even been used on the “Willow Vale” property by the father of the current owner.

Woo Back! 2014, Yass NSW Australia_15_cpyrgt

What  a truly magnificent sight! History in the making and living history.

A glorious tribute to the farming pioneers of this country and a fascinating showcase for the beautiful horses.

Congratulations to all four-legged and two-legged participants!!

More photos of the “Woo Back!” Event will follow, including antique farm machinery, carriages and vintage tractors.

The Woo Back! event was held at “Willow Vale”, Hardwicke Lane, Yass, NSW, Australia on 4 May 2014

"Willow Vale" property near Yass, New South Wales, Australia

“Willow Vale” property near Yass, New South Wales, Australia

For more information on WOO BACK! 2014 see the official website and Facebook page: 

www.wooback.com.au

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wooback-Yass-World-Record

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For the TV news coverage of the World Record go to:

Heavy horses set a new ploughing record in Yass.

ABC News (online), Mon 5 May 2014, 7:34am AEST

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-04/horsepower-on-display-at-yass/5429350

Big Horses – Big Hearts

ABC News (online), Mon 17 Mar 2014, 1:32pm AEDT

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-03-17/big-horses—big-hearts/5326006

From hotel to eternity (Weekly Photo Challenge: Threshold)

The old Commercial Hotel, in Yass New South Wales, Australia

Poor old pub, on its last legs.

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This grand old watering hole sits abandoned in the main street of Yass (New South Wales, Australia). It dominates Comur Street and is one of the oldest and largest buildings in the centre of town.

The last drink was poured around 2005. The poor old Commercial Hotel has sat idle since, a wry smile across its tooth-gapped facade. The chatter and din of merrymakers just a memory echoing faintly across the floor boards.

In its heyday it was one of 27 inns in Yass or nearby. It was the coaching stop for Cobb and Co. coaches connecting Yass to the railway that terminated at Gunning at the time, half an hour away, and to places further bush.

Although the pub sold in 2010 it has remained abandoned, slowly falling apart bit by bit, helped by some wanton vandals. The beautiful wrought iron has been broken panel by panel. Precious stained glass windows and door panels have been kicked in.

Last year, though, some effort to band-aid the decay was made. The downstairs doors and windows facing the street were painted with bright murals to celebrate the ‘Turning Wave Festival‘.

But as I was taking these photos on Sunday a passerby told me that the Commercial was going to be pulled down soon and a three storey building with shops and apartments built instead. History gone.

But a new beginning awaits!

So raise your glass to the poor old pub and ‘be on yer way home now’.  

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Weekly Photo Challenge, ‘Threshold’

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/04/04/photo-challenge-threshold/

Photos taken 2 March 2014 with Fuji FinePix S2980

Commercial Hotel, established in the 1840s, cnr Comur and Lead Streets, Yass, New South Wales, Australia

For some photos of the interior of the pub see the real estate pages from May 2010.

 

My new Aussie blog: ‘History Head in Walking Boots’

Ein Paar Schuhe (A Pair of Shoes) by Van Gogh - Wikipedia

Ein Paar Schuhe (A Pair of Shoes) by Van Gogh (1887) – Wikipedia

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I’ve been happily blogging on Daytripper Sippers about ‘living and wandering on the road less travelled in country Australia’. That’s in the here and now.

But some of my travels have followed in the footsteps of my ancestors. So I have created a new space for sharing those places.

History Head in Walking Boots

I love the stories of people and their lives: everyday people I have come across in history and the people I have found while climbing my family tree. History Head in Walking Boots will share those stories and show the old things I have been given – as well as the places my history hunting has taken me.

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History is a work in progress.

We live in history,

where we walk others have trodden before – and others will again.

The stories from the past and our present are stories for the future.

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I am also the story keeper of my family – and having recently lost my elderly father – it’s time to pass on what I have learned, for others.

Learn the stories and pass them on!

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Join me on my discovery trail at HISTORY HEAD IN WALKING BOOTS.

Once a week blog – I’m thinking HHinWB will have a once-a-month longer researched topic and the other weeks of the month photo posts or history vignettes and snippets.

I would love to hear your thoughts or suggestions for HHinWB as it develops. So drop me a line.

And feel free to fire away any questions. I have a wondering nature, so I love questions. That just gives me an excuse to go hunting again!

I hope you enjoy sharing my discoveries with me!

CC, a Daytripper Sipper and a History Head in Walking Boots

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Image source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Van_Gogh_-_Ein_Paar_Schuhe1.jpeg#file

Bridge to my past (Weekly Photo Challenge: Abandoned)

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For seven years we lived in Bungendore, New South Wales, a little village about half an hour on the other side of Canberra. We were “blow-ins”, with an unknown surname, not born in the local area. At least we had country credentials but we were still new bloods.

Or so I thought!…

After some family tree discoveries I found I was related to one of the large pioneering families, the Barretts, from a little rural locality just 2o minutes east of our village!!

Boro Creek, Mayfield Road at Lower Boro, New South Wales, Australia

Spanning the generations

My great, great, great grandmother Catherine Doolan and her sister Mary were Irish assisted immigrants and had migrated to Australia together from County Clare in 1841.

On the same ship was a Patrick Barrett. Mary later married Patrick and they took up land on the Boro Creek between the villages of Bungendore and Tarago.

As we do, we had aimlessly driven the crisscrossing dirt roads in the back blocks around our village.

Some of those dirt roads had passed right by the front gates of the Barrett family properties. Boro Creek cut through Barrett land. They held large blocks on either side of the creek between the mid 1840s and the early 1900s.

This is the old disused bridge over Boro Creek, on Mayfield Road at Lower Boro.

I was game and walked its rickety deck – I just had to throw a pebble in the water hole beneath.  

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Weekly Photo Challenge, ‘Abandoned’

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/02/28/photo-challenge-abandoned/

Photos taken 7 November 2009 with my old Canon Powershot A550

* “a blow-in” – a stranger, or someone who comes from somewhere else

Lower Boro, via Tarago, New South Wales, Australia

http://www.bonzle.com/c/a?a=p&p=19826

 

My convicts: new Aussie history blog coming soon

UPDATE

Parramatta Female Factory Precinct, Cumberland Hospital, Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia

Family on the inside

So what happened to Catherine Dixon my great, great, great, great grandmother?

She was transported to New South Wales and then was ‘sent down’* to the Parramatta Female Factory in 1838 with her six-year-old daughter. I followed her footsteps at the ‘Factory’ with my camera. I looked into what life would have been like for the two of them inside the 16 foot stone walls.

See my earlier posts, A Convict in the Tree and A Convict Inside

And I promised to tell the story of what happened to Catherine and her children next…

And then…

Looking into the records I found something weird…

an odd error turned into something strange, turned into something very fishy…

Are the records the sloppy work of the superintendent and the oddities just a weird string of ‘errors’?

Or

is there a chain of children ‘swapping’ going on?

I’m sorry to keep you hanging but it requires more digging to sort out my suspicions…

And now that my history bent has taken flight on this blog, I’m going to start an Australian history / family history blog for the stories that don’t quite fit here on Daytripper Sippers.

It’ll be a week yet. I’ll keep you posted when it’s up and running.

And Catherine Dixon, my family convict (and others), will have a home of her own.  ♦

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* ‘sent down’ – sent to prison or gaol / jail,

In Catherine’s case, she was ‘sent down’ to the Female Factory in Parramatta, a penitentiary, workhouse, refuge and convict women’s hospital near Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

A convict inside (Parramatta Female Factory)

Original 1818-21 wall of the Parramatta Female Factory (2nd class yard), New South Wales, Australia

1818 convict wall, Parramatta Female Factory                        (2nd Class yard)

In 1838 Catherine Dixon found herself on the wrong side of this wall. She was my great great great great grandmother. So I retraced her footsteps, with my camera, to see what life was like for her ‘on the inside’.

Why was Catherine ‘inside’?

She was a thirty year old widow sentenced to 14 years transportation for receiving stolen goods [Lancaster Quarter Sessions 1836 trial register]. Her four young children were sent with her to New South Wales.

(To see a description of what Catherine looked like and more on her transportation to Australia go to Part 1, ‘A convict in the tree’.)

At the journey’s end Catherine had been assigned to M Sparke of Sydney. But soon afterward she and her daughter were sent to this place, the Female Factory in Parramatta.

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